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Podcast Episodes That Will Free You From Tourist-Filled Tour Groups Vol. 2

Podcast Episodes That Will Free You From Tourist-Filled Tour Groups Vol. 2

Stuff You Missed in History Class Podcast
This podcast was actually my gate-way drug into the world of podcasts. At first I was overwhelmed with the vast library of episodes they've created since 2008, but the more I listened, the more I was just relieved I wouldn't run out any time soon.

Through many of these episodes, you'll be asking yourself, why DIDN'T they teach this in history class? People would have paid attention!

Personally, and I've mentioned it before, it was always a running-gag ever year that, "Bet you we won't get past World War II in History Class." No one would take that bet. We'd never, ever, get past World War II! There was never enough time in the school year. Come summer-time, I'd be disappointed again, and peruse the untouched chapters in the back of the history textbook. This podcast was all of my dreams come true, and more. Not only does it go past World War II, but it goes all over the world. Histories I didn't know, that I didn't know.

What amazing podcast hosts! I'm not ashamed to admit that I really wish Holly Frey and Tracy V. Wilson were my best friends in real life. They're REAL, and personable, and I find when they laugh in an episode, I'm already laughing too. Thank you Holly and Tracey, and thank you Stuff You Missed in History Class past hosts!

Here's an iTunes banner to help you find it quickly:


Stuff You Missed in History Class Podcast: German History Episodes
This is a podcast series that is still producing content, and on a bi-weekly schedule. There are hundreds of episodes from years of content creation, and I made a valiant effort to grab every one that covered Germany. That being said, I'll add more to this list as I find them, or as they're created. New episodes are around 30-40 minutes, while some of the earliest episodes run around 5 minutes.

Each episode title is a link that will take you to that episode's page on the Stuff You Missed in History Class website. There, you can choose to either download the episode or follow links to Google Play or iTunes to download the episode.

**Content Housekeeping**
All of the amazing and witty episode synopses you'll read below are written by the Stuff You Missed in History Class team and Copyright © 2016 HowStuffWorks, a division of InfoSpace Holdings LLC. The original source can be found by clicking the respective episode title link.

German Fairy Tales
A Grim Tale: The Brothers Grimm "Fairy tales weren't always safe fodder for the latest Disney film. In fact, some were downright macabre. Learn more about the original versions of fairy tales -- and the eccentric brothers responsible for popularizing them -- in this podcast."
Was There Really a Pied Piper of Hamelin? "Everyone knows the story of the Pied Piper -- but how much of this legend is factual? Learn more about the fact and fiction behind the story of the Pied Piper in this podcast from HowStuffWorks.com."

German Royal Intrigues
Charlemagne's Coronation "On Christmas Day in 800 AD, Charlemagne became the emperor of Rome in a coronation headed by none other than Pope Leo III. Learn more about the growth of the Holy Roman Empire in this podcast from HowStuffWorks.com."
Mad King Ludwig Dines Alone "From his opulent, solitary dinners to the amazing Neuschwanstein Castle, it's no surprise that King Ludwig II was known as an eccentric. In fact, people thought he was mad. But why?"
The Princess Who Swallowed A Glass Piano "Princess Alexandra Amelie of Bavaria was part of the House of Wittelsbach. The princess was frail, and she exhibited unusual behavior. She told her parents that she had swallowed a glass piano as a child, and was afraid that she would shatter."
The Prisoner Princess: Sophia Dorothea of Celle "Sophia Dorothea of Celle (Lower Saxony, Germany) married her cousin, George I of Great Britain. Sophia had an affair with a Swedish count, and her in-laws decided to stop the couple from running away together. The ensuing events became known as the Königsmarck Affair."

German Women Making History
Caroline Herschel: Astronomy's Cinderella "Herschel managed to break the barrier of women in scientific fields far earlier than you might suspect, in part because of her association with her brother, and in equal measure due to her steadfast dedication to her work.
Emmy Noether, Mathematics Trailblazer "In the early 20th century in Germany, Emmy Noether pursued a career in mathematics, despite many obstacles in her path. She became one of the most respected members of her field, and developed mathematical theory that's still important today."
Hildegard von Bingen "Hildegard was a Christian mystic of medieval Europe who was way, way ahead of her time. If she had lived a few hundred years later, and been male, people probably would have called her a renaissance man."
The Women of Bauhaus "While the Bauhaus school is well known, and its original manifesto proclaimed an environment of equality, most of the women who went to the school were ushered into specific courses, rather than given their choice of studies."

Germans in the American Revolution
Hessians "If you've only seen the Hessians referenced in movies or TV, you probably don't have a clear picture of who these very capable soldiers actually were. Hessian troops were skilled, disciplined armies for hire, and a huge economic boon for their homeland."

Germany in WWI
What was the Christmas Truce? "Amid the bloodshed of World War I, the Pope pled for a truce on Christmas Day. The commanding powers refused the truce, but soldiers across Europe crossed battle lines to spend Christmas with the enemy."

Germany in WWII
The Bloodiest Battles of World War II
Could Treasure Hunters Have Discovered Nazi Gold? "Several treasure hunters think they might have found Nazi gold. Learn about the history of Nazi gold, the role of Swiss banks and much more in this podcast from HowStuffWorks."
Did Any Germans Resist Hitler? "During World War II, the Nazi totalitarian party did not tolerate dissent. Despite the risks involved, some Germans did attempt to resist Hitler's government. In this episode, Katie and Sarah explore the story of the White Rose, a secret resistance group."
How Hitler's Propaganda Machine Worked "Adolph Hitler's legendary propaganda programs steered public opinion with unprecedented precision."
Improbably Effective Holocaust Rescuers "There are many amazing, heroic stories of people who risked everything to protect Jews and other people at risk before and during the holocaust. A few turned to particularly ingenious, unexpected or daring plans to save people."
Live from FanX: Nazis, the Occult and Indiana Jones "It's fairly common knowledge that the Nazis were prolific looters and that there was occult interest among the officers of the organization. How weird did things actually get, and how close are the Indiana Jones movies to what really happened?"
Sink the Bismarck! "The German battleship Bismarck was the most feared warship in the world - a powerful complement to U-boats. But when she sank the pride of the British fleet, the battle cruiser Hood, in a matter of minutes, her fate was sealed."
The Nazi Games and Jesse Owens "Most people associate the 1936 Berlin Olympics with African-American sprinter Jesse Owens. Yet the games were successful in terms of Nazi propaganda: More nations than ever participated, and the Olympic torch was used for the first time."
The Match of Death "After the Nazis invaded Kiev, a bakery owner asked some Ukrainian soccer players to form a team. Their team was pitted against occupying powers. Many say their crucial victory over the Germans led to their deaths. But how much of the story is true?"
Who Stole the Amber Room "Often hailed as "the eighth wonder of the world," the Amber Room is an opulent room adorned with gold and precious amber. History buffs would love to see the room for themselves, but there's one problem: it's missing."
Who Wore the Pink Triangle? "When Hitler came to power in Germany, gays and lesbians were continually persecuted. Soon, homosexual men also faced prison time. Thousands were eventually arrested, and many wound up in concentration camps, where they were labeled with pink triangles."

Who Would Have Been the Nazi King? "Although Edward VIII is often remembered as a British King who abdicated the throne for love, FBI files suggest that there may have been a more sinister motive. Tune in and learn more about Edward VIII's possible Nazi connections in this podcast."

Cold War Germany
How the Berlin Wall Worked "The Berlin Wall divided a country and a city, but it had a purpose. Learn more about its history and how JFK and Barack Obama fit into the picture in this podcast from HowStuffWorks.com."

German Discoveries
Johann Beringer's Fossils "In 1725, Beringer was the University of Würzburg's chair of natural history and chief physician to the prince bishop. He was also unpopular, and some of his colleagues sought to discredit him. There are two versions of the story -- but which is true?
Johann Dippel and the Elixir of Life "Johann Konrad Dippel was born in 1673 at Frankenstein Castle. Originally a theology student, Dippel began dabbling in chemistry, medicine and alchemy. Today he's remembered for creating a panacea that was used on a variety of ailments. How did he do it?"
The Kaiser's Chemist: Fritz Haber "Fritz Haber has a mixed legacy. The Nobel-Prize-winning Father of Chemical Warfare was responsible for fertilizers that fed billions, as well as poisonous gasses used during World War I. Tune in to learn more about Fritz's complicated life and work."

Why Podcasts?
With my work as a product photographer (read: photographing inanimate objects that don't talk), I've dived headfirst into a love and appreciation for podcasts. It reminds me of the simpler days of being read to after recess, but where an audiobook is a big commitment financially and time-wise, podcasts are free and in short-installments. Its a lifelong learner's experience of being a kid in a candy store without any cliff-hangers to disturb your afternoon.

All the better, you can learn more about the history and culture of the country you're going to visit. The more you know beforehand, the less likely you'll feel the need for a guided tour group. One episode at a time, you're becoming a more independent traveler.

Follow Along
If you enjoyed this article, or these topics sound interesting to you, you'll love our weekly newsletter. You'll receive a free Germany Packing list for signing up, and you'll receive each week's newest posts every Friday. Thank you for reading!




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Podcast Episodes That Will Free You From Tourist-Filled Tour Groups Vol. 1

Podcast Episodes That Will Free You From Tourist-Filled Tour Groups

I hit the jackpot with this podcast series. If you find a beginning and an end comforting, prefer an experienced narrator, and only covers German history, OH, just wait, do I have the podcast series for you!

Why Podcasts?
I have no shame in admitting its really hard to find time to read. With my work as a product photographer (read: photographing inanimate objects that don't talk), I've dived headfirst into a love and appreciation for podcasts. It reminds me of the simpler days of being read to after recess, but where an audiobook is a big commitment financially and time-wise, podcasts are free and in short-installments. Its a lifelong learner's experience of being a kid in a candy store without any cliff-hangers to disturb your afternoon.

All the better, you can learn more about the history and culture of the country you're going to visit. The more you know beforehand, the less likely you'll feel the need for a guided tour group. One episode at a time, you're becoming a more independent traveler.

Germany: Memories of a Nation BBC Radio 4
Love history? Feel like the only thing you learned about Germany in school is war, war, and more war? Following the success of Neil MacGregor's Story of the World in 100 Objects, in 2014 MacGregor returned by delving through German history through 30 objects in 30 episodes. With a total running time of 6 hours and 40 minutes spread out across 30 episodes. Download all of them. Trust me, you'll wish there were more!


400 minutes | 6 hours and 40 minutes

Follow Along
If you enjoyed this article, or these topics sound interesting to you, you'll love our weekly newsletter. You'll receive a free Germany Packing list for signing up, and you'll receive each week's newest posts every Friday. Thank you for reading!




How to Get Mobile Internet in Germany & Our 10 Favorite iPhone® Travel Apps

How to Get Mobile Internet in Germany & Our 10 Favorite iPhone® Travel Apps

Technology has come very far in the past years and most of us carry a small computer in their purse or pants, that is not limited to calls anymore. We have already covered the essentials to take with you on our free packing list and today we will expand the list with our favorite apps.

However, many apps are simply useless if they are not fed with data over a Wifi or 3G/4G connection. It does not help if you want to pull up the departure time of your train just to find out you have to be online to get that information while in a foreign country. To get mobile internet on your smartphone in Germany, you have four choices:

1. Use a Roaming Plan With Your Current Cell Phone Carrier
This will be your most convenient, but also most expensive option (unless your provider is T-Mobile, see below). Check your carrier's website for details on international data roaming charges. Our provider offers a $40 plan with unlimited text messaging, but only 200MB of data. If you use FaceTime or another video messaging app, you will get about an hour until you run out of data. Web surfing on your smartphone will give you about 3 hours total until you reach 200MB. Let’s look at some other options.

2. Switch to a T-Mobile Plan
T-Mobile offers unlimited international roaming in over 140 countries including Germany. If your cell phone contract is up and you are looking for a different provider, check out T-Mobile (which is a company of the German telecommunications company Deutsche Telekom). Once you land in Germany, take your phone off the airplane mode and it will automatically lock itself into the German T-Mobile network for no additional fees. Internet speeds will the slower than in the United States, but you will still have a 2G or 3G access to the mobile network. http://www.t-mobile.com/

3. Buy a German Prepaid Sim Card with a Data Internet Plan
This works only if your phone is unlocked from your cell phone carrier. If you are unsure, give them a call and ask. Once you land in Germany, walk into a discount grocery store, like Aldi or Lidl and buy a sim card for $10-$15 to put into your smartphone. Word of advice though: You will have to set the card up yourself with the setup process in German. For a good overview on available sim cards and providers, look at this website: http://www.mygermanphone.de/

4. Purchase a Wireless Hotspot device to create your own network
Our favorite way to go online in Germany is a hotspot device called GlocalMe G2 (affiliate link). It looks like one of the first iPhones, but is about twice as thick and heavy since it includes a large 6,000mAh battery. Upon purchase it comes with 1GB of data included and you can buy more at €0.05 per Megabyte or €20 - 30 per Gigabyte, based on which package you choose. Simply turn it on, wait for about two minutes for the bootup and login to complete and then connect up to 5 wireless devices to it. This is the best solution for us, allowing both of our phones, a laptop and two family members to be online at the same time and with the extra large battery we also use it to charge our phones if we run low.

Now that we figured out how you can be online during your trip to Germany..

Our 10 Favorite Travel Apps for the iPhone®

Get Help with Translating
Google Translate is our go-to app when it comes to translations and gets better every year. You can download the free offline package for German and then translate any text, even without an internet connection. Another great feature is to hold your phone in front of a sign that you need translated and it will show you a translation of the sign within seconds. If you have an internet connection while using Google Translate, you can also use the speech version, where you can speak your native language into the phone and within seconds the phone will translate what you just said. It works well enough for simple conversations, helping overcome the language barrier.

Youth Hotspots
This app makes it easy to find free wireless internet access around you while in Germany. It uses the GPS in your iPhone to locate you and then shows you a map or list of places with free Wifi. This app was developed by the German National Tourism Office and claims to have over 1,300 free networks listed all over Germany. We did not try all of them, but it has come in handy several times during our travels.

Travel via Train
If you are traveling Germany by train, download the DB Navigator App from Deutsche Bahn. It will give you train timetables for regular, underground and S-Bahn trains plus buses and trams. You can also purchase and store your tickets within the app, no need for a printed copy anymore. Some ticket purchases require you to show your ID and the credit card you purchased the ticket with, so keep those handy while you are on the train.

Navigate a City Offline
City Maps 2Go gives you free offline maps that you can download before you travel and find your way around even without internet access. Zoom into the area you would like to save and click the prompt on top of the screen to download the map. You do need an Internet connection to download maps initially, but once downloaded, the maps are accessible anywhere. After you land in Germany, open the app and click on your saved map. Your GPS in your phone will guide you from now on.

Find Great Restaurants Around You
Yelp is my favorite app to find a restaurant based on your location. This is extremely helpful if you come back to your hotel after a day of sightseeing and want to find a great (or at least decent) restaurant with good food nearby. I open Yelp, click on Nearby at the bottom and look at close-by recommendations. I have found many great restaurants over the years that we would have missed if we just would have walked by them.

Be “Old-Fashioned” and Send a Postcard
We are always on the lookout for nice postcards when we are travelling in order to share our favorite sights with our family members back home. Often we find very generic or cheesy postcards, other times we find a great postcard but have trouble finding stamps and a local post office. That is where Postagram comes in, letting you choose one of your favorite travel pictures and complete it with a personalized message next to it. The picture can also pop out of the actual card as a keepsake for the recipient.

Stay in Touch With Your Friends and Family
Faster than a postcard are messages we send via WhatsApp. You can send pictures, share your current location or simply chat with people you want to stay in contact with while you travel. The newest version also has the ability to video-chat or voice call others for free, given that they also have WhatsApp installed and both ends have a working internet connection.

Convert Your Currency
Download the XE Currency app and it will convert any foreign currency into your own currency based on the current exchange rate. The rates are updated when you have an internet connection, but the app can also be used offline, when it will use the last known currency rate that it downloaded.

Organize Your Itinerary
TripIt automatically organizes and lists all your trip details in one place. Simply forward every trip-related reservation email (flights, accommodation, car rentals, etc.) to plans@tripit.com and it automatically converts all the details from the email to your itinerary.

Worst-Case Scenario
In Case of Emergency lets you enter all of your health information and even has the option to display all that information in your lock screen. You can add your medications, allergies and travel insurance information (we recommend this one) and show it to doctors or emergency personnel if needed.

I am sure there are some travel apps we have forgotten! Which ones do you recommend?

Follow Along
If you enjoyed this article, or these topics sound interesting to you, you'll love our weekly newsletter. You'll receive a free Germany Packing list for signing up, and you'll receive each week's newest posts every Friday. Thank you for reading!




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Thank you For Reading! Denise & Sebastian | Photo by Irene Fiedler